New to Factoring?

For those who aren't familiar with factoring, it is basically a fast way to get cash to run your business.

Factoring is Not a Loan

When you send your customers an invoice, they usually have 30 days to pay you back. Factoring companies will give you the bulk of the cash up front, sometimes within 24 hours, and collect the payments from your customers themselves. Once the invoices are paid in full, you’ll get the balance left over, minus a small fee.


Factoring Doesn't Require Debt

Sounds simple enough – fast cash for your business – no loans, no debt.

So how do you go about choosing the best factoring company?

Not all of them are created equal. Not all of them will give you the same level of service you need to help grow your business.

Everyone claims they have the simplest rate structure in the industry, no long-term contracts, same day funding, no up-front fees, no monthly minimums or maximums, fuel partnership programs for truckers, instant credit checks, etc., etc., etc.

We also offer these same benefits, but we GO THE EXTRA MILE FOR YOU that other factoring companies don’t.

Here’s Why We Are The Factoring Company You Need For Your Business

No other factoring company matches our level of superior service and offerings.


As you can see, we simply have more to offer you.

Other factoring companies don’t even compare.
Des Moines

And Not All Factoring Companies Can Say This:

More than half of our new business comes through client referrals.

So, Can Your Company Use Factoring?

Of Course! Companies of all sizes, from small privately-owned companies to large multi-national corporations, use factoring as a way to increase their cash flow. Factoring spans all industries, including trucking, transportation, manufacturing and distribution, textiles, oil and gas, staffing agencies and more.

Companies use the cash generated from factoring to pay for inventory, buy new equipment, add employees, expand operations—basically any expenses related to their business. Factoring allows a company to make quicker decisions and expand at a faster pace.

Unlike a bank loan, factoring has…

  • No principle or interest to pay over time
  • No debt to repay
  • Unlimited funding potential – no caps
  • Fast funding – no waiting months like at a bank
  • Approval is based on the strength of your clients, not your credit
  • Startups are welcome in using funding services

Some of the benefits you receive with factoring are:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Information for the city of Des Moines

Des Moines is the capital and the most populous city in the U.S. state of Iowa. It is also the county seat of Polk County. A small portion of the city extends into Warren County. It was incorporated on September 22, 1851, as Fort Des Moines which was shortened to Des Moines in 1857. It is named after the Des Moines River, which may have been adapted from the French Rivi�re des Moines, meaning River of the Monks. The city's population was 203,433 as of the 2010 census. The five county metropolitan area is ranked 88th in terms of population in the United States with 594,600 residents according to the 2014 estimate by the United States Census Bureau.Des Moines is a major center of the U.S. insurance industry and has a sizable financial services and publishing business base. In fact, Des Moines was credited as the number one spot for U.S. insurance companies in a Business Wire article and named the third largest insurance capital of the world.

 

The city is the headquarters for the have large operations in or near the metro area. In recent years have established data processing and logistical facilities in the Des Moines metro. magazine ranked Des Moines as the Best Place for Business in both 2010 and 2013. In 2014, NBC ranked Des Moines as the Wealthiest City in America according to its criteria.Des Moines is an important city in U.S. presidential politics because it is the capital of Iowa, which is home to the first caucuses of the presidential primary cycle. Hence, many presidential candidates set up campaign headquarters in Des Moines. A 2007 article in The New York Times stated if you have any desire to witness presidential candidates in the most close up and intimate of settings, there is arguably no better place to go than Des Moines.Many insurance companies are headquartered in Des Moines,. Des Moines has been referred to as the Hart of the West because of this.

 

The Principal is one of two Fortune 500 companies having headquarters in Iowa, ranking 273rd on the magazine's list in 2009.As a center of financial and insurance services, other major corporations headquartered outside of Iowa have established a presence in the Des Moines Metro area,. magazine ranked the Des Moines metropolitan area first on its list of Best Places For Business And Careers, based on factors such as the cost of doing business, cost of living, educational attainment, and crime rate

 

 

Information for the state of Iowa

While Iowa is often viewed as a farming state, in reality agriculture is a small portion of a diversified economy, with manufacturing, biotechnology, finance and insurance services, and government services contributing substantially to Iowa's economy. Manufacturing is the largest sector of Iowa's economy, with $20.8 billion (21%) of Iowa's 2003 gross state product. Major manufacturing sectors include food processing, heavy machinery, and agricultural chemicals. Sixteen percent of Iowa's workforce is dedicated to manufacturing. Food processing is the largest component of manufacturing.

 

Its industrial outputs include food processing, machinery, electric equipment, chemical products, publishing, and primary metals. Directly and indirectly, agriculture has always been a major component of Iowa's economy. However, the direct production and sale of raw agricultural products contributes only about 3.5% of Iowa's gross state product. The indirect role of agriculture in Iowa's economy can be measured in multiple ways, but its total impact, including agriculture-affiliated business, has been measured at 16.4% in terms of value added and 24.3% in terms of total output. Iowa also has a strong financial and insurance sector, with approximately 6,100 firms. Ethanol production consumes approximately one-third of Iowa's corn production, and renewable fuels account for 8% of the state's gross domestic product. A total of 39 ethanol plants produced 3.1 billion US gallons (12,000,000 m3) of fuel in 2009.

 

If you did not have to wait for the cash flow to come in what would you do right now?  

The main benefit of Truck Factoring is that a business is not required to wait one or two months (sometimes more) for payment by a customer, the business will receive cash in hand to operate and grow their business. -Iowa Trucking Factoring Companies

 

 

WILL YOU HELP ME GET MONEY?  

Iowa Trucking Factoring Companies Articles

Financing Temporary Staffing Agencies

 

In recent years temporary staffing agencies have become very profitable, because the current business environment prefers to outsource employees rather than hire them. This situation creates a very attractive and viable opportunity for temp staffing agencies. But, similar to other businesses, in order to operate a successful temp staffing agency, working capital is an absolute necessity. This requirement of working capital has become a problem for most agencies who often suffer from a cash flow crisis. Having adequate cash flow prevents the company from being run effectively, thus stopping the company from adding new clients. The result is that the business fails to grow. Fortunately, there is a solution to this problem, and the solution is the right type of financing.

 

Payroll and Bills Must Be Paid on Time!

 

The most important and probably the biggest expense of any temp staffing agency is employee payroll. Obviously, employees expect to be paid regularly and on time, and if this is not the case, they'll quickly move on and find work elsewhere. In addition, the agency needs funds to pay for other employee-related expenses, such as employment taxes. When a business fails to comply with tax regulations the costs involved can be extensive and can the even put the business itself in jeopardy.

 

Business Growth Is Impossible without Funds

 

Generally, Government and commercial clients pay their invoices somewhere between 30 and 60 days, and it's this timeframe that creates problems for temp staffing agencies. When an agency takes on a new client, before they start getting paid, the agency must be able to pay the employee's salary for up to two months.

 

This means that the only way to grow a temp staffing agency is to have a cash reserve to pay for running expenses. If you don't have a reserve of funds, then you can't take on new contracts; and if you work with larger contracts you need a larger reserve. And this is where it becomes a vicious cycle, because if you can't take on new contracts then business growth is impossible.

 

Payroll Funding: Helping Your Business Grow

 

Fortunately, there is a solution available for temp staffing agencies to resolve this very common financial problem, and it's known as Payroll Funding, or Payroll Financing. Payroll Funding is a solution that's been designed to help staffing agencies access much-needed working capital.

 

Payroll financing is actually a type of Invoice Factoring, allowing you to finance your slow-paying receivables. This type of funding provides your temp staffing agency with immediate funds. Now there'll be no more waiting for your Government and commercial clients to pay in 60 days - the payroll funding company will pay you within a day or two! Now you'll have the working capital your agency so desperately needs to meet payroll and other expenses; and now you can move forward and grow your business without constantly worrying about slow paying clients!

 

How Does Factoring Work?

 

Factoring is a very straightforward process. Basically, invoices are financed in two separate payments, with the first payment covering approximately 90% of the gross invoice value, and the second payment, which is the remaining 10% less factoring fees, is remitted to you once your client has paid. The first payment is paid into the temp staffing agency's bank account very soon after the invoice has been submitted for financing. In the meantime, your clients are not required to pay any sooner - they simply pay on their regular schedule.

 

Payroll Funding Is Available to Small Agencies

 

One huge advantage of factoring is that it's available to small agencies (even start-ups!) that don't have many assets. Because it's the invoices which are the assets the factoring company is financing, it's the credit quality of your customers that the factoring company is most interested in. Factors can only finance invoices if your customer (the payer) has good commercial credit, and that's why factoring has become a very viable and attractive option for both small and growing agencies whose greatest asset is their good clients.

 

Growing Your Agency with Factoring

 

Let's take a closer look at how your temp staffing agency can use invoice factoring to grow your company. We'll assume for the purpose of this article that you have a new client who requires six full-time employees for a few months. This new client is a large corporation and has a good reputation. The problem with this corporation, however, is that they pay their invoices in 50 days, and there's no way you can afford to carry the cost of the contract.

 

What's the solution? The solution is actually quite simple: you invoice the client weekly and factor the invoice! This funding strategy allows you to service the contract by providing your agency with weekly funds to pay employees. Providing you have clients with good credit and your agency provides good services, receivables factoring can be used very effectively to grow your business.

 

When factoring is used properly, it can help grow your temp staffing agency well beyond its current financial capabilities.

 

 

If you did not have to wait for the cash flow to come in what would you do right now?

 

 

Iowa Trucking Factoring Companies Articles

Questions You Need to Ask Your Factoring Company

 

In today’s marketplace we’re seeing more and more factoring companies, and factoring fees, rates and agreement terms have become very competitive. This means that, as a potential factoring customer, this competitiveness should work to your advantage. However, there are some issues you must consider when choosing a factoring company to suit your specific requirements.

 

Before entering into any factoring agreement, here are some important questions you should ask –

 

What Are Your Terms?

 

As a factoring customer, you’ll be looking for as much flexibility in your factoring agreement as possible. It may be that you choose a long term contract with your factoring company if it includes flexible rates or a price break. In today’s competitive market, many factoring companies are agreeing to adjust their rates based on competitive offers from other factors or increased factoring volume.

 

The majority of factoring agreements are a one year contract, which appears to be industry standard, and this contract will renew automatically unless you provide the factoring company either 60 or 90 days notice.

 

What’s Your Fee Structure?

 

The fee structure may vary depending on both the factoring company involved and your industry. Some factoring companies charge a flat fee, which is calculated as a percentage of the total value of the invoice. On the other hand, other factoring companies charge additional fees to cover costs associated with doing business, such as money transfers, software, and so on. Ensure that the factoring company you’re considering working with is completely upfront and transparent with you about its terms and fees.

 

Are You Able to Offer Both Recourse and Non Recourse Factoring?

 

Recourse factoring:

 

Recourse factoring is less expensive than non recourse factoring. With recourse factoring, you (being the client) are ultimately responsible if the factoring company is unable to collect on your customers’ invoices. However, you’re not necessarily required to pay the debt out of pocket if you have a recourse agreement and the customer defaults on payment. It may be that the factoring company will withhold a portion of future cash payments or payments held in reserve, with the money being placed in an escrow account until such time as the debt has been paid.

 

Non recourse factoring:

 

When you have a non recourse factoring agreement, the credit risk for the collection of customers’ invoices lies with the factoring company.Therefore, we believe it’s to your advantage to use a factoring company that offers both recourse and non recourse factoring, simply because you may find that some of your customers are more suitable for recourse factoring than others. In addition, you need a factoring company with a strong credit team because they can work with you to ensure you’re dealing with good customers: to a certain degree this will relieve some of the pressure of being responsible for bad debt.

 

How Long Has the Factoring Company Been in Business?

 

With the marketplace becoming increasingly competitive, today we’re seeing the creation of more and more factoring companies. However, many of these companies are recent start ups, with limited industry experience. Make sure you research the factoring company’s history prior to entering into any factoring agreement: also research its background into providing financial services in your specific industry.

 

Do You Have the Capital to Grow with Me?

 

The fact that there’s no limit to the level of financing is the major advantage factoring has over traditional bank lending. As your company continues to grow, so too should the funding of invoices grow with you. Do your research and learn as much as possible about your potential factoring company’s client base and their capital structure.

 

Does this factoring company have a limit to the number of debtors it takes on? What’s a typical account size? What’s the factoring volume of their largest client? You’ll probably find that factoring companies who have been serving your industry for many years will have greater capacity to finance your company as it continues to grow.

 

Is There Anything Else You Can Do for Me?

 

Obviously, factoring is more expensive than a conventional bank loan, and this is partly due to the back office services that your factoring company is able to provide. Besides collections and financing, many factoring companies will evaluate companies in your industry and provide credit information. Therefore, when looking for a factoring company for your business, make sure the one you choose offers additional services and products that can assist you in making good business decisions.

 

How Do We Start Factoring?

 

Fortunately, factoring companies are not unduly concerned about your balance sheet before they decide to work with you, unlike banks. However, they do have a process to follow when selecting new clients, so be sure you understand what the factoring company is looking for when it’s considering you as a client. Are they looking at your credit ratings and/or your customers’ payment histories?

 

Are they looking at your personal credit score?

 

In many cases a company will start factoring because it’s looking for a quick injection of cash, so you need to know how many days the factoring company will take to review and process your application.

 

 

 

 

Iowa Trucking Factoring Companies Articles

How Medical Staffing Helps The Medical Industry

 

Mary Henderson sat in her office, waiting for the phone to ring. Her job was a busy one, and she had stopped all her calls and shut her door five minutes before the phone conference was set to begin just to get some time for herself. The truth was she was stressed to her breaking point. Her company Med Staff needed to hire three new people to cover the demand of their clients. The problem was, they couldn’t. They were short on funds.

 

Med Staff did temporary medical staffing. They employed LPN’s, RN’s, and a few others of the same ilk. Companies that needed nursing for a short amount of time paid Med Staff, and the nurses were sent over on short term contracts. Then they came back, and they were sent somewhere else.

 

A retirement home had contacted Mary two weeks ago, they were undergoing an expansion, and they would need temporary staffing until they could appoint permanent nurses to the shifts. Mary had known she didn’t have enough people for this, but she took the contract on anyways, figuring she could hire people. There were always a number of nurses and technicians applying for work at Med Staff, and she knew it wouldn’t be a problem to hire a few new people.

 

There had been a problem though. There simply wasn't enough money in the books to do it. The company was doing fine, but a quick expansion, even as small as three people, simply wasn’t going to happen, not without help.

 

She had gone to the bank for a loan, but they had denied her. It seemed to Mary that the only people who could get loan money from a bank were the people who didn’t need to do so. And then she had found something different, a website online about factoring. She had looked the site over, and set up the conference call.

 

The phone rang, she picked it up. “Hello?”

 

“Hi, is this Mrs. Henderson?” a cheery woman’s voice asked over the phone.”

 

“It is.”

 

“Great! My name is Stacy, I’m going to help you today.”

 

“Okay great.” Mary said.

 

“I’m looking over the form you filled out, it looks like your company temporarily staffs medical professionals?”

 

“Yes,” Mary said. “Nurses mostly.”

 

“Great,” Stacy said. “And if you called me, it means you ran into a snag.”

 

“I took a contract to fill five places in an expanding retirement community. I have two people available but needed to hire three more. Unfortunately, we just don’t have that kind of money in the books right now. We have a few outstanding invoices yet to be paid, but until they come in, there’s nothing I can do.”

 

“Do you know how factoring works?” Stacy asked.

 

“Not really,” Mary admitted.

 

“Okay, well we don’t look at your business credit, we look at your clients’ credit. We know they have some time to pay bills, and we’re interested to see if they can pay those bills. If they can, we become interested in helping you out, because we think all businesses should have a fair shot to make it, and sometimes things just don’t work out.”

 

“This is the first time it hasn’t worked out,” Mary said. “And it’s hard.”

 

“I know. I hear about it every day. The cool thing about my job is I get to help fix it. So what we do, if we feel secure in our ability to help you, is we buy a piece of your accounts receivable. We aren’t just loaning you money, we’re basically becoming active in your business. That is you get the money you need right now, but we have an assurance that we get our money back, later down the road.”

 

Mary nodded behind her desk, even though the other woman couldn’t see her. She had never heard of factoring before she came across the site on the internet, but the way Stacy explained it certainly made sense.

 

The call continued, with Mary giving the information that Stacy would need. She promised to get back to her within a couple of days, and then they hung up. Mary went on with her work, and a day and a half passed.

 

Mary was at her desk when he phone rang then. It was Stacy.

 

“Good news,” she said as soon as Mary said hello. Mary couldn’t help but smile as Stacy went on. “We’re going to be able to help you out.”

 

“You don’t know how great it is to hear you say that,” Mary said.

 

“Believe me, I do,” Stacy said. “I get to say it more often than not, and I know that we’re really helping good people, and good businesses.”

 

“The bank, they couldn’t do anything,” Mary said, she felt salty tears stinging her eyes as they welled there.

 

“They aren’t built to help people like we are. They just want as much money as they can get. We want money too, because it’s a business, but if you don’t succeed, we don’t succeed, and it’s also important to us that we help people.”

 

“So what’s next?” Mary asked.

 

“Well the real answer is I fax some stuff over for you to fill out and sign, but the fun answer is your business gets the help it needs, and you keep going to work each day. Well, not the weekends.”

 

Mary couldn’t help but laugh. “Believe me,” she said. “I work plenty of weekends.”

 

Stacy laughed as well, and then got the fax number she would need. Once again the women hung up and Mary let out a long breath as she sat back in her chair. She used a tissue to dab the tears from her eyes. She knew everything was going to be okay.

 

 

 

You Can Find More Information at  http://truckingfactoringcompanies.org/
and at Receivables Factoring at businessdebtloan.org

Call Us Today at: 1-866-593-2195

 

Watch our Factoring Company Video below to see how we work for you.

 

 


 

Get MONEY NOW for your outstanding receivables.

 

 

Some history on the Freight Broker Industry

 

The Logistics and Transportation Industry in the United States

The logistics and transportation industry in the United States is highly competitive. By investing in this sector, multinational firms position themselves to better facilitate the flow of goods throughout the largest consumer market in the world.. International and domestic companies in this industry benefit from a highly skilled workforce and relatively low costs and regulatory burdens.

 

Shipping Port

 

Spending in the U.S. logistics and transportation industry totaled $1.33 trillion in 2012, and represented 8.5 percent of annual gross domestic product (GDP). Analysts expect industry investment to correlate with growth in the U.S. economy.

 

A highly integrated supply chain network in the United States links producers and consumers through multiple transportation modes, including air and express delivery services, freight rail, maritime transport, and truck transport. To serve customers efficiently, multinational and domestic firms provide tailored logistics and transportation solutions that ensure coordinated goods movement from origin to end user through each supply chain network segment. Industry Subsectors

 

Logistics services: This subsector includes inbound and outbound transportation management, fleet management, warehousing, materials handling, order fulfillment, logistics network design, inventory management, supply and demand planning, third-party logistics management, and other support services. Logistics services are involved at all levels in the planning and execution of the movement of goods.

 

Air and express delivery services (EDS): Firms offer expedited, time-sensitive, and end-to-end services for documents, small parcels, and high-value items. EDS firms also provide the export infrastructure for many exporters, particularly small and medium-sized businesses that cannot afford to operate their own supply chain.

 

Freight rail: High volumes of heavy cargo and products are transported long distances via the U.S. rail tracking network. Freight rail moves more than 70 percent of the coal, 58 percent of its raw metal ores, and more than 30 percent of its grain for the nation. This subsector accounted for approximately one third of all U.S. exports.

 

Maritime: This subsector includes carriers, seaports, terminals, and labor involved in the movement of cargo and passengers by water. Water transportation carries about 78 percent of U.S. exports by tonnage, via both foreign-flag and U.S.-flag carriers.

 

Trucking: Over-the-road transportation of cargo is provided by motor vehicles over short and medium distances. The American Trucking Associations reports that in 2012, trucks moved 9.4 billion tons of freight, or about 68.5 percent of all freight tonnage transported domestically. Motor carriers collected $642 billion in revenues, or about 81 percent of total revenue earned by all domestic transport modes.

 

Industry Associations:

 

American Association of Port Authorities
American Society of Transportation and Logistics
American Trucking Associations
Association of American Railroads
Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals
Express Delivery and Logistics Association
Industry Publications:

 

American Shipper
Journal of Commerce
Material Handling & Logistics
Transport Intelligence
Transport Topics

 

North American Industry Classification System For Transportation

 

The Transportation and Warehousing sector includes industries providing transportation of passengers and cargo, warehousing and storage for goods, scenic and sightseeing transportation, and support activities related to modes of transportation. Establishments in these industries use transportation equipment or transportation related facilities as a productive asset. The type of equipment depends on the mode of transportation. The modes of transportation are air, rail, water, road, and pipeline.

 

The Transportation and Warehousing sector distinguishes three basic types of activities: subsectors for each mode of transportation, a subsector for warehousing and storage, and a subsector for establishments providing support activities for transportation. In addition, there are subsectors for establishments that provide passenger transportation for scenic and sightseeing purposes, postal services, and courier services.

 

A separate subsector for support activities is established in the sector because, first, support activities for transportation are inherently multimodal, such as freight transportation arrangement, or have multimodal aspects. Secondly, there are production process similarities among the support activity industries.

 

One of the support activities identified in the support activity subsector is the routine repair and maintenance of transportation equipment (e.g., aircraft at an airport, railroad rolling stock at a railroad terminal, or ships at a harbor or port facility). Such establishments do not perform complete overhauling or rebuilding of transportation equipment (i.e., periodic restoration of transportation equipment to original design specifications) or transportation equipment conversion (i.e., major modification to systems). An establishment that primarily performs factory (or shipyard) overhauls, rebuilding, or conversions of aircraft, railroad rolling stock, or a ship is classified in Subsector 336, Transportation Equipment Manufacturing according to the type of equipment.

 

Many of the establishments in this sector often operate on networks, with physical facilities, labor forces, and equipment spread over an extensive geographic area.

 

Truck Transportation

 

Industries in the Truck Transportation subsector provide over-the-road transportation of cargo using motor vehicles, such as trucks and tractor trailers. The subsector is subdivided into general freight trucking and specialized freight trucking. This distinction reflects differences in equipment used, type of load carried, scheduling, terminal, and other networking services. General freight transportation establishments handle a wide variety of general commodities, generally palletized, and transported in a container or van trailer. Specialized freight transportation is the transportation of cargo that, because of size, weight, shape, or other inherent characteristics require specialized equipment for transportation.

 

Each of these industry groups is further subdivided based on distance traveled. Local trucking establishments primarily carry goods within a single metropolitan area and its adjacent nonurban areas. Long distance trucking establishments carry goods between metropolitan areas.

 

The Specialized Freight Trucking industry group includes a separate industry for Used Household and Office Goods Moving. The household and office goods movers are separated because of the substantial network of establishments that has developed to deal with local and long-distance moving and the associated storage. In this area, the same establishment provides both local and long-distance services, while other specialized freight establishments generally limit their services to either local or long-distance hauling.

 

General Freight Trucking

 

This industry group comprises establishments primarily engaged in providing general freight trucking. General freight establishments handle a wide variety of commodities, generally palletized, and transported in a container or van trailer. The establishments of this industry group provide a combination of the following network activities: local pickup, local sorting and terminal operations, line-haul, destination sorting and terminal operations, and local delivery.

 

General Freight Trucking, Local

 

This industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in providing local general freight trucking. General freight establishments handle a wide variety of commodities, generally palletized and transported in a container or van trailer. Local general freight trucking establishments usually provide trucking within a metropolitan area which may cross state lines. Generally the trips are same-day return.

 

General Freight Trucking, Long-Distance

 

This industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in providing long-distance general freight trucking. General freight establishments handle a wide variety of commodities, generally palletized and transported in a container or van trailer. Long-distance general freight trucking establishments usually provide trucking between metropolitan areas which may cross North American country borders. Included in this industry are establishments operating as truckload (TL) or less than truckload (LTL) carriers.

 

General Freight Trucking, Long-Distance, Truckload

 

This U.S. industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in providing long-distance general freight truckload (TL) trucking. These long-distance general freight truckload carrier establishments provide full truck movement of freight from origin to destination. The shipment of freight on a truck is characterized as a full single load not combined with other shipments.

 

General Freight Trucking, Long-Distance, Less Than Truckload

 

This U.S. industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in providing long-distance, general freight, less than truckload (LTL) trucking. LTL carriage is characterized as multiple shipments combined onto a single truck for multiple deliveries within a network. These establishments are generally characterized by the following network activities: local pickup, local sorting and terminal operations, line-haul, destination sorting and terminal operations, and local delivery.

 

Specialized Freight Trucking

 

This industry group comprises establishments primarily engaged in providing local or long-distance specialized freight trucking. The establishments of this industry are primarily engaged in the transportation of freight which, because of size, weight, shape, or other inherent characteristics, requires specialized equipment, such as flatbeds, tankers, or refrigerated trailers. This industry includes the transportation of used household, institutional, and commercial furniture and equipment.

 

Used Household and Office Goods Moving

 

This industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in providing local or long-distance trucking of used household, used institutional, or used commercial furniture and equipment. Incidental packing and storage activities are often provided by these establishments. Specialized Freight (except Used Goods) Trucking, Local

 

Specialized Freight (except Used Goods) Trucking, Long-Distance

 

This industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in providing long-distance specialized trucking. These establishments provide trucking between metropolitan areas that may cross North American country borders.

 

Freight Broker

 

A freight broker is an individual or company that serves as a liaison between another individual or company that needs shipping services and an authorized motor carrier. Though a freight broker plays an important role in the movement of cargo, the broker doesn't function as a shipper or a carrier. To operate as a freight broker, a business or individual must obtain a license from the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA). Freight brokers are required to carry surety bonds as well.

 

Freight broker services are valuable to both shippers and motor carriers. Freight brokers help shippers find reliable carriers that might otherwise be difficult to locate. They assist motor carriers in filling their trucks and earning money for transporting a wide variety of items. For their efforts, freight brokers earn commissions.

 

Freight brokers use their knowledge of the shipping industry and technological resources to help shippers and carriers accomplish their goals. Many companies find the services provided by freight brokers indispensable. In fact, some companies hire brokers to coordinate all of their shipping needs.

 

Often, freight brokers are confused with forwarders. Though a freight forwarder performs some of the same tasks as a freight broker, the two are not the same. A forwarder takes possession of the items being shipped, consolidates smaller shipments, and arranges for the transportation of the consolidated shipments. By contrast, a freight broker never takes possession of items being shipped thus in the absence of negligent entrustment, a freight broker is not normally involved as a party litigant in a cargo claim dispute, although as an accommodation, the freight broker may assist the shipper at their request and expense with filing freight claims.

 

NAICS Index Description

 

484110 Bulk mail truck transportation, contract, local
484110 Container trucking services, local
484110 General freight trucking, local
484110 Motor freight carrier, general, local
484110 Transfer (trucking) services, general freight, local
484110 Trucking, general freight, local
484121 Bulk mail truck transportation, contract, long-distance (TL)
484121 Container trucking services, long-distance (TL)
484121 General freight trucking, long-distance, truckload (TL)
484121 Motor freight carrier, general, long-distance, truckload (TL)
484121 Trucking, general freight, long-distance, truckload (TL)
484122 General freight trucking, long-distance, less-than-truckload (LTL)
484122 LTL (less-than-truckload) long-distance freight trucking
484122 Motor freight carrier, general, long-distance, less-than-truckload (LTL)
484122 Trucking, general freight, long-distance, less-than-truckload (LTL)
484210 Furniture moving, used
484210 Motor freight carrier, used household goods
484210 Trucking used household, office, or institutional furniture and equipment
484210 Used household and office goods moving
484210 Van lines, moving and storage services
484220 Agricultural products trucking, local
484220 Automobile carrier trucking, local
484220 Boat hauling, truck, local
484220 Bulk liquids trucking, local
484220 Coal hauling, truck, local
484220 Dry bulk trucking (except garbage collection, garbage hauling), local
484220 Dump trucking (e.g., gravel, sand, top soil)
484220 Farm products hauling, local
484220 Flatbed trucking, local
484220 Grain hauling, local
484220 Gravel hauling, local
484220 Livestock trucking, local
484220 Log hauling, local
484220 Milk hauling, local
484220 Mobile home towing services, local
484220 Refrigerated products trucking, local
484220 Rubbish hauling without collection or disposal, truck, local
484220 Sand hauling, local
484220 Tanker trucking (e.g., chemical, juice, milk, petroleum), local
484220 Top-soil hauling, local
484220 Tracked vehicle freight transportation, local
484220 Trucking, specialized freight (except used goods), local
484230 Automobile carrier trucking, long-distance
484230 Boat hauling, truck, long-distance
484230 Bulk liquids trucking, long-distance
484230 Dry bulk carrier, truck, long-distance
484230 Farm products trucking, long-distance
484230 Flatbed trucking, long-distance
484230 Forest products trucking, long-distance
484230 Grain hauling, long-distance
484230 Gravel hauling, long-distance
484230 Livestock trucking, long-distance
484230 Log hauling, long-distance
484230 Mobile home towing services, long-distance
484230 Radioactive waste hauling, long-distance
484230 Recyclable material hauling, long-distance
484230 Refrigerated products trucking, long-distance
484230 Refuse hauling, long-distance
484230 Rubbish hauling without collection or disposal, truck, long-distance
484230 Sand hauling, long-distance
484230 Tanker trucking (e.g., chemical, juice, milk, petroleum), long-distance
484230 Tracked vehicle freight transportation, long-distance
484230 Trash hauling, long-distance
484230 Trucking, specialized freight (except used goods), long-distance
484230 Waste hauling, hazardous, long-distance
484230 Waste hauling, nonhazardous, long-distance

 

Economic Impact of Trucking

 

The importance of trucking can summed up by an old industry addage: "If you bought it, a truck brought it." Retail stores, hospitals, gas stations, garbage disposal, construction sites, banks, and even a clean water supply depends entirely upon trucks to distribute vital cargo. Even before a product reaches store shelves, the raw materials and other stages of production materials that go into manufacturing any given product are moved by trucks.

 

Trucking is vitally important to U.S. industry, however, measuring the impact of trucking on the economy is more difficult, because trucking services are so intertwined with all sectors of the economy. According to the measurable share of the economy that trucking represents, the industry directly contributes about 5 percent to the gross domestic product annually. In addition, the industry plays a critical support role for other transportation modes and for other sectors of the economy such as the resource, manufacturing, construction, and wholesale and retail trade industries

Third Party Logistics-Freight Brokers 

Freight Brokers

 

Freight brokers are federally regulated and bonded companies. Most commonly they have a vast network and access to a library of freight carriers and search for the right availability based on customer specifications. These brokers also offer various value-added services that encompass transportation, logistics, and distribution. Typically, freight brokers do not touch the freight. They engage in helping shippers find the best price with the best carrier for any given load.

 

The proliferation of freight brokers called for an increase in financial integrity and liability of these companies, which has led to the passing of the Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act. In order to obtain a license to broker freight, a freight brokerage must purchase a surety bond or trust agreement with the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration. Prior to June 2012 when the bill was signed by President Obama, the surety bond coverage required to hold a broker license was $10,000. Effective October 1, 2013, the surety bond requirement increased to $75,000.

 

Other logistics companies include 3rd-Party Logistics Providers. They offer a variety of supply chain and distribution-related practices and techniques in order to improve in-house logistics. The main difference between a traditional freight broker and most 3rd-Party Logistics Providers is that freight brokers do not actually touch the freight, whereas 3rd-Party Logistics providers often do.

 

 

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